6.29.2008

Clark goes after McCain on Face the Nation

Not only is Wesley Clark right in saying this, Democrats should be screaming this from rooftops. John McCain's military record doesn't mean he's more prepared to be President. In fact, if McCain thinks it does and since he mentions it at every turn, I'd say it's fair game. I's also say it really does quite the opposite.

If you look at it honestly, his time as a POW, FIVE YEARS, makes him UNFIT to have his finger on the proverbial nuclear trigger. He's mentally unstable, as even the AZ GOP is saying out loud.

From Muhajabah.com:

Here is video from Face the Nation of retired General Wesley Clark slamming McCain for running on a platform of foreign policy experience.



Here's how the Caucus Blog at New York Times reported on it:

Retired General Wesley Clark, who had been an ardent supporter of Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton and a former Democratic presidential candidate himself, said on CBS’ “Face the Nation,” that Mr. McCain “hasn’t held executive responsibility” and had not commanded troops in wartime.

Mr. McCain’s experience in Vietnam, where he was a war prisoner for five years, and his senatorial work on the Armed Services Committee, has seemed to grant him a degree of invulnerability in security debates. But on Sunday he was assailed by a fellow military man, a highly decorated one who was once the NATO supreme allied commander, and that made the remarks all the more stinging.

Senator McCain frequently points out that he led “the largest squadron in the U.S. Navy,” but Mr. Clark said that that was not enough to stake a claim to the presidency.

“He hasn’t been there and ordered the bombs to fall” as a wartime commander, the general said. Mr. Clark is sometimes mentioned as a possible Obama running mate.

When CBS’ Bob Schieffer noted to Mr. Clark that the Republican senator had been shot down over Hanoi, the former general replied plainly, “I don’t think riding in a fighter plane and getting shot down is a qualification to be president.”

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